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Meeting the challenge of race in therapy practice

The event

Psychotherapy and counselling is essentially about addressing psychological wounds and meeting distress. We interpret and make sense of destructive, disconnected and dis-inhibited behaviours and this understanding supports our compassion, connection and responsiveness. When it comes to race hurt and race distress however, clear thinking and compassion often give way to fear and confusion. To meet the challenge of working with race in therapy practice, we need to understand our unconscious re-enactments from our generational past, but where do we begin?


In this workshop we will be exploring what happens in our minds and also importantly in our bodies in the midst of the race conversation; to explore how a mindful approach to our physiological responses might support us as therapists in staying at the contact boundary of our own and our clients’ experience – and find our voice.

The trainer:

Eugene Ellis is an activist, writer and public speaker on issues of race, difference and intersectionality. He trained as an Integrative Arts Psychotherapist and has a special interest in body-orientated therapies and mindfulness. He is also the founder and director of The Black, African and Asian Therapy Network (BAATN), a network of therapists committed, passionate and actively engaged in addressing the psychological needs of Black, African and South Asian people in the UK.


Eugene has a particular interest in the impact of intergenerational and familial trauma in the context of race. His book, 'The Race Conversation: An essential guide to creating life-changing dialogue', explores the intersection of race and trauma, the non-verbal communication of race and how to navigate oppressive patterns.