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Alcohol Use During the Pandemic

  • 16th Nov 2020
  • Stefan Walters

As the coronavirus crisis disrupts clients’ usual routines and attachments, how do we assess for problematic drinking, and support clients to find alternative sources of safety and security? To mark Alcohol Awareness Week, addiction specialist Stefan Walters shares some helpful questions for exploring clients’ relationships with alcohol during the pandemic.

East Meets West Couples Counselling 2/5: Dating

  • 13th Nov 2020
  • Kathrine Bejanyan

Couples counselling can involve different considerations when working between Western individualist and Eastern collectivist cultures. Dr Kathrine Bejanyan is a relationship therapist with a PhD in Social Psychology. In the second part of her blog series, she looks at how attitudes to dating may vary, and the therapeutic work of helping with conflictual feelings.

Refugee Clients: When ‘Resettlement’ Unsettles

  • 10th Nov 2020
  • Jude Boyles

How do we ground and resource a trauma survivor when the risk remains real? For refugees who have been ‘resettled’ in areas of the UK with high crime rates, the triggers are everywhere. Jude Boyles reflects on supporting the search for internal and external safety among Syrian and Iraqi refugees.

East Meets West Couples Counselling 1/5: Cultural Influences

  • 6th Nov 2020
  • Kathrine Bejanyan

Couples counselling can involve different considerations when working between Western individualist and Eastern collectivist cultures. Dr Kathrine Bejanyan is a relationship therapist with a PhD in Social Psychology. In this new blog series, she will provide an overview of how norms and dynamics may diverge when counselling couples from these different cultures, from the role of the extended family to attitudes towards the therapist.

Adolescent Suicidality: Grieving for Childhood

  • 3rd Nov 2020
  • Brad Sachs

Being a teenager involves unavoidable developmental losses – for both the adolescent and their parents. It is often unconscious grief around individuation and separation, argues Brad E. Sachs, that is the source of suicidality in young people. Here, the psychologist, author and family therapist explains how exploring the loss of childhood can bring revelation, relief and resolution for both generations.

Supporting Lonely Clients

  • 30th Oct 2020
  • Roz Shafran

The coronavirus pandemic has both exacerbated, and drawn attention to, a problem of social isolation. Roz Shafran, Professor of Translational Psychology at the UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, has been conducting research into psychological approaches to tackling loneliness. Here, she suggests six ways we can help clients who are lonely – and argues for more communication between therapists and community groups that foster social connection.

Working with Avoidant Attachment: Affect Regulation and Mourning

  • 26th Oct 2020
  • Linda Cundy

How can we help avoidant clients to drop their defences and allow deep emotions to emerge? In her sixth blog about working with highly defended clients, Attachment-based psychoanalytic psychotherapist Linda Cundy discusses the centrality of affect regulation and mourning in this work, taking in the role of countertransference, self-compassion and humour, Fairbairn’s ‘moral defence’ and Stern’s ‘moments of meeting’.

Dissociative Identity Disorder: Using the Countertransference

  • 23rd Oct 2020
  • Rémy Aquarone

The countertransference can be an essential tool when working with clients whose experiences of early trauma have led to Dissociative Identity Disorder. Rémy Aquarone, Director of the Pottergate Centre for Dissociation and Trauma, explains how sharing our psychic responses to client material serves the development of an inquisitive and proactive dialogue – helping clients with DID work towards an integrated self.

Complex Traumatisation: An Integrative Mind-Body Approach

  • 16th Oct 2020
  • Arielle Schwartz

We cannot simply think our way out of our innate, physiological stress and trauma responses. Ahead of three events for PESI UK this Autumn, Dr Arielle Schwartz explains the difference in presentation between parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system states, and sets out her mind-body rationale for working with complex PTSD, including exercises to promote somatic awareness and a flexible approach to protective behaviours.