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Wimbledon Guild Counselling Training

For over 20 years The Wimbledon Guild Counselling Training has offered counsellors of every level the opportunity to learn new skills and take part in training.

We choose high quality speakers and frequently look for topics that have cross-modality appeal. We have an enduring interest in attachment-based counselling models and, in addition to a CPD programme, we are currently offering the first attachment-based counselling training in Great Britain.

Our courses are accessible to those that work or have other commitments and are most often offered on the weekend.

Courses

Course

Integrating Body, Breath & Movement within our Therapeutic Relationships using Trauma Sensitive Yoga

A 2-day workshop for health professionals, mental health workers and yoga teachers with a keen interest in making their current clinical practice more trauma informed whilst gaining confidence and practical skills to take back to their practise to integrate the body, breath and movement when working with anxiety, depression & trauma.

• On completion of this 2-day workshop you will gain an understanding of the core concepts of working with the body, breath and movement in therapy, focusing on treatment for anxiety, depression & trauma.

• You will gain practical tools to integrate into your current clinical or therapeutic practice focusing on the body, breath and movement. These tools are trauma informed, including, Trauma Sensitive Yoga, which is a proven treatment for survivors of trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) offering effective healing and symptom reduction, it is a clinically validated method of yoga researched by Bessel van der Kolk in the USA. Trauma sensitive yoga has foundations in Trauma Theory, Attachment Theory, Neuroscience and Hatha Yoga with an emphasis on mind body connection, breathing and movement.

• You will leave with a deep understanding of the importance of Science in relation to bringing the body, breath & movement into therapy including Neuroscience , the Autonomic Nervous System & Poly Vagal Theory

Lorna Evans is an Integrative Psychotherapist registered with UKCP & BACP, holding an MSc in Body Awareness & Psychotherapy and PGDip in Integrative Psychotherapy. Lorna now proudly integrates Psychotherapy and Yoga with a focus on the Body, Breath & Movement for treatment of anxiety, depression and trauma. Recently working on documentaries and projects with The Discovery Channel, BBC, SKY as well as other press for Medium, BBC and BACP Magazines promoting her work.

Course

The Therapist’s Own Attachments- with Linda Cundy a 2 day CPD event

This 2-day event will help participants reflect on their own attachment history, personal and professional.

Please note spaces are strictly limited for this event and once sold out no further tickets will be released

Two day workshop cost: £255 + booking fees Early bird until 4th September 2021 or sold out £216.24 + booking fees (please note once early birds are sold out no further will be released)

Each day will run from 10am to 4pm

The workshop:

This 2-day event will help participants reflect on their own attachment history, personal and professional, and how that has shaped the person they are now. It will be highly experiential and make use of creative approaches including use of art.

Further details to follow

The trainer:

Linda Cundy is an attachment-based psychoanalytic psychotherapist, supervisor, and independent trainer who has a long association with the Wimbledon Guild. She has written and edited three books to date (Love in the Age of the Internet: Attachment in the Digital Era; Anxiously Attached: Understanding and Working With Preoccupied Attachment; and Attachment and the Defence Against Intimacy:

Understanding and Working with Avoidant Attachment, Self-Hatred, and Shame) as well as a number of articles published in professional journals. She has a private psychotherapy practice in North London.

Workshops

Workshop

Working with the Unspoken. When talking is not enough

A workshop for counsellors and psychotherapists interested in deeply exploring body awareness in therapy and illuminating working with non-verbal phenomena and countertransference

Mind and body are fully integrated and what the therapist notices in the client’s body, or experiences in her own body, energy, tension, holding or other non-verbal phenomena is vital to bring into awareness and into the work with our clients. Today, our clinical work with traumatised and abused clients, both adult and child, coupled with recent neuroscience research, emphasises how trauma is held in the body and how a bodily understanding is essential for therapists working with trauma, anxiety and depression. This workshop will deeply explore body awareness in therapy and illuminate working with non-verbal phenomena and countertransference. We will draw on a range of body psychotherapy theory, clinical examples and group discussions, whilst reflecting on the therapists felt countertransference in her own body. We will incorporate a newer understanding of the Autonomic Nervous System, Poly Vagal Theory, the Breath, Movement and felt energy in the therapist’s body as key pillars of the day.

Workshop

From coercive control through to physical and sexual violence: Working with Interpersonal Violence and Domestic Abuse -Christiane Sanderson

The workshop:

On average, two women a week in the UK are murdered by their partner or ex-partner. While much of the clinical literature focuses on physical violence in domestic abuse (DA), there is increasing evidence that power, control, coercion and emotional abuse is used to control partners in intimate relationships. This workshop, which would be especially relevant for psychotherapists, counsellors, psychologists and psychiatrists, aims to enhance our comprehension of DA, its impact and long term effects on survivors; while explaining how, as practitioners, we can work effectively using the principles of safe trauma therapy, psychoeducation and stabilisation to restore control and to allow for the processing of the DA narrative. It will look at the spectrum of DA, including the dynamics of control and coercion in emotional abuse, and the role of shame and humiliation that silences those who are being domestically abused.



The workshop will consider the use of physical force, sexual violence, financial abuse, spiritual abuse and revenge porn, and identify those most at risk of interpersonal violence and DA. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the processes involved in DA such as grooming victims, the cycle of abuse, the role of dissociation and thought blindness that supports the trauma bond which binds the couple. The aim is to understand how victims may present in practice, to identify signs and symptoms of DA and how they can be understood and supported. the role of attachment and fear of abandonment that underpins much of DA and how this manifests relationally both for the couple and practitioners working with DA. We also look at the importance of the therapeutic relationship in restoring relational worth, mitigating the de-humanising effects of DA and restoring autonomy and self-agency.


Conceptualising DA within the complex trauma framework, we consider the processing of the DA narrative and the facilitation of post traumatic growth. By identifying the challenges of working with DA and introducing a range of therapeutic skills, practitioners will feel more equipped when working with survivors of DA and enhance their comprehension of the transformative effects of post traumatic growth for both clients and practitioners.

Specifically, we will consider:

• The nature and dynamics of DA, such as the role of charm and enticement, the use of control and coercion, the cycle of abuse, the nature of thought blindness that facilitates the trauma bond

• The role of silence, secrecy and stigmatisation

• The role of shame

• The role of dissociation

• The intergenerational transmission of DA through attachment and relational deficits

• The characteristics of male and female perpetrators DA as complex trauma and its neurobiological impact

• The psychological impact and long term effects of DA on partners, and children

• Obstacles to leaving an abusive relationship

• The importance of developing safety plans when leaving

• The need for safety and multi-agency collaboration

• The need for longer term therapy using a trauma informed practice model when working with survivors of DA

• The role of the therapeutic relationship in restoring autonomy and self-agency

• The impact of working with DA on practitioners and the role of self-care


The trainer

Christiane Sanderson BSc, MSc. is a senior lecturer in Psychology at the University of Roehampton, of London with over 30 years of experience working with survivors of childhood sexual abuse and sexual violence. She has delivered consultancy, continuous professional development and professional training for parents, teachers, social workers, nurses, therapists, counsellors, solicitors, the NSPCC, Towards Healing, Ireland. the Catholic Safeguarding Advisory Committee, the Methodist Church, the Metropolitan Police Service, SOLACE, the Refugee Council, Birmingham City Council Youth Offending Team, and HMP Bronzefield.

She is the author of Counselling Skills for Working with Shame, Counselling Skills for Working with Trauma: Healing from Child Sexual Abuse, Sexual Violence and Domestic Abuse, Counselling Adult Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse, 3rd edition, Counselling Survivors of Domestic Abuse, The Seduction of Children: Empowering Parents and Teachers to Protect Children from Child Sexual Abuse, and Introduction to Counselling Survivors of Interpersonal Trauma, all published by Jessica Kingsley Publishers. She has also written The Warrior Within: A One in Four Handbook to Aid Recovery from Sexual Violence; The Spirit Within: A One in Four Handbook to Aid Recovery from Religious Sexual Abuse Across All Faiths and Responding to Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse: A pocket guide for professionals, partners, families and friends and Numbing the Pain: A pocket guide for professionals supporting survivors of childhood sexual abuse and addiction for the charity One in Four for whom she is a trustee.

Workshop

Dangerous desires- psychodynamics of addiction with Martin Weegmann

The workshop:

In the first, famous 'drug confessional' (1820), Thomas de Quincey refers to his opium as a 'portable panacea', which could be 'bought for pennies and carried in a waistcoat'. What began as his dream became his nightmare. Addiction is consuming in the depths to which it affects individuals, just like de Quincey, and extensive in the breath to which it affects families and even whole communities. Alcohol and drug misuse are enormous public health challenges


The workshop is a brief introduction to the psychodynamics of addiction. How might psychodynamic approaches aid an understanding and treatment of the powerful, seductive and baffling nature of addiction? And how is recovery from substance use disorders possible? Martin will share some of his experience over a period of 20 years in the field, in a range of NHS settings, as well as 5 years as a Non-Alcoholic Trustee ('NAT') with AA.

The workshop will have interactive components, throughout the day.

The trainer:

Martin Weegmann is a Clinical Psychologist and Group Analyst, with 30 years NHS experience. He has specialised in substance misuse, personality disorders and complex needs. Martin brought out Psychodynamics of Addiction (2002, Wiley) and and published 5 other books, his latest the edited Psychodynamics of Writing (2018, Routledge). He is busy at work on a new, more popular book, Stories of an NHS Psychologist.

Workshop

‘Normalised Neglect & Privileged Abandonment’ An introduction to work with Boarding School Syndrome and Trauma with Nick Duffell

The Workshop:

Any therapist’s daily practice includes early deprivation and family of origin work, so the client with attachment problems will be familiar. But what is rarely understood is the sophistication of the ex-boarder’s “survival self” and the widespread devastation it brings to individuals, couples and families over generations.

Despite frequent references in English popular literature to the agonies experienced by children at boarding schools, the long-term psychological effects of a boarding education have, until very recently, remained unnoticed by the medical and psychological professions. In Britain, boarding education carries high social status, is considered a privilege, and is rife with parental expectation, and yet can lead to unacknowledged, deeply buried and emotionally damaging consequences.

Ex-boarders are amongst the most difficult clients. This is due to both the social dimension of the syndrome and the strength of the secret internalised shame. The self in distress is frequently masked by a very competent, if brittle, socially rewarded exterior. For these reasons, even experienced analysts and therapists may unwittingly struggle to skilfully address the needs and tactics of this client group. This one-day workshop will provide a mix of didactic teaching and practical learning, and we will also be showing clips from the BBC film The Making of Them.

You will learn to:

• Detect boarding issues underlying present problems

• Understand the Strategic Survival Personality

• Break through the silence, shame and denial

• Loosen double-binds about privilege and envy

• Understand the institutionalised dimension of hierarchies, bullying and abuse

• Identify and work with specific transference dynamics

• Learn to work with traumatic dissociation

• Learn to work with acute projections of incompetence and vulnerability

• Understand the ex-boarder’s tactics for intimacy avoidance and how this affects loved ones and partners

The trainer:

Nick Duffell is best known as the author who asserts that elite boarding schools represent a trauma for children and a socio-political handicap for nations. Having practised psychotherapy for 30 years, he now trains therapists and is a psychohistorian, bridging the gap between psychological and political thinking and an Honorary Research Associate at UCL. He promotes a depth-psychology perspective of issues that deeply affect public life, such as identity and emotions, fear and vulnerability, but which are not properly addressed in political commentary. Nick’s books include The Making of Them: the British Attitude to Children and the Boarding School System, 2000, Wounded Leaders: British Elitism and the Entitlement Illusion - a Psychohistory, 2014, Trauma, Abandonment and Privilege: A guide to therapeutic work with boarding school survivors, with Thurstine Basset, 2016 and The Simpol Solution: A New Way to Think about Solving the World’s Biggest Problems, with John Bunzl. He contributed chapters to The Political Self and Humanistic Psychology: Current Trends, Future Prospects.He contributed chapters to The Political Self and Humanistic Psychology: Current Trends, Future Prospects.

This event will be open to psychological therapists (including trainees) from all modalities and healthcare professionals.

Workshop

Understanding the Effects of Attachment Style on the Teenage Years

The workshop:

The start of the workshop includes the basics of Attachment Theory this workshop will act as a useful refresher for those familiar with the theory.

Neuroscience of the Adolescent Brain- Exploration of current research into how the adolescent brain differs from the preadolescent brain, and the adult brain. From which to gain a greater understanding of issues that occur at this stage of development.

Attachment style in Adolescence -There will be time to consider how infant and child attachment style contributes to this stage in life that straddles care seeking behaviours and personal exploration in the adult world. We have space to explore peer relationships, and relationships with parents.

Managing Difficult Behaviours- Information about attachment style and the influence of how attachment style contributes to our understanding of behaviours such as alcohol misuse, drug taking, and self harm.

Exercises- although not essential it will be useful for participants to spend time in advance to consider their own client work and come ready to work with a particular client in order to complete exercises to practice these important new skills.

The workshop will offer an experience that enhances work with this challenging but very rewarding client group.

The trainer:

Working in clinical practice for more than 20 years Niki trained as a Psychodynamic Counsellor in the early 90’s and then as an Attachment Based Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist at The Bowlby Centre in London.

Workshop

When the therapist says ‘Goodbye’- Using attachment theory to explore endings imposed by the therapist

The Workshop:

A day for counsellors, therapists and supervisors who want to consider the impact of these forced endings.

• retirement

• maternity leave

• moving house

• sabbatical

• illness in the therapist or her family


We are likely to face one or more of these challenges in our working life and taking time to reflect on the ethical and clinical implications can help us when we face sensitive choices. For therapists who are approaching ‘peri-retirement’ the day could provide a space to reflect on the ambivalence about ending and perhaps to clarify the choices about timetabling closure and informing clients. The Covid-19 pandemic will have coloured or even precipitated some of these experiences and we will hold that in our reflections.


The imposition of a forced ending could be on the one hand a rich opportunity for deeper engagement, and on the other an intrusion of the therapist’s own needs and an irreparable break in the frame which compromises the work. How can we work in a way which minimises the harmful impact of this abandonment and maximises the opportunity? The emphasis will be on planned endings imposed by the therapist but we will give some thought to emergency endings and referral on.


This one day seminar aims to help therapists:

• Identify our assumptions about a good enough ending and how we can facilitate that.

• Recognise the meaning to a client of a forced ending and the ways this may impact on the remaining months of work.

• Reflect on the therapist’s ambivalence about imposing an ending – for whatever cause.

• Recognise how attachment patterns influence the way both client and therapist experience an imposed ending.

• Identify the practical implications of closing a practice.

• Identify ethical dilemmas arising from this intrusion of the therapist’s own agenda.

• Consider the supervisor’s role in supporting the clinical challenge of a imposed ending.

• Consider the supervisor’s own retirement and closure.


Learning will be through presentation, questions, discussion, experiential exercises and sharing.



The trainer:

Anne Power has qualifications from The Bowlby Centre, Westminster Pastoral Foundation, Tavistock Relationships and Relate. She has taught on supervision and therapy trainings at The Bowlby Centre, WPF and at Regents University London and has a private practice in central London for both couples and individuals. Her book, Forced Endings in Psychotherapy, explores the process of closing a practice for retirement or other reasons. Her published papers explore attachment meaning in the consulting room and in the supervision relationship. She is currently researching and writing about logic versus magic in partner choice: random romance, arranged marriage, and dating sites – what’s the difference?

Conferences

No results found.

Open Days

No results found.

Online

Online

An Introduction to Trauma Sensitive Yoga : 2 Hour Zoom Workshop Multiple Dates

Trauma Sensitive Yoga has foundations in Trauma Theory, Attachment Theory, Neuroscience and Hatha Yoga practice, with an emphasis on Mind Body connection, Movement and Breathing.

Trauma Sensitive Yoga creates a safe place where people can begin to reconnect with their bodies and over time clients learn to be present and begin to experience the effects of taking positive action and making choices. This gentle yoga is designed specifically for those who are already in counselling, psychotherapy, EMDR, PTSD symptoms or those in close contact with their GP or health workers. It is also very useful knowledge to have in your tool box at this time of Covid-19, when many of our clients are being triggered and we can integrate these trauma tools into our work.

Lorna will demonstrate ways of integrating trauma sensitive tools to meet the challenges of helping clients in a time of shared crisis. You will be able to use these tools in your online work as well as when we return to working in a shared space.

The workshop will be delivered fully online via Zoom, and combine self-reflective exercises with theoretical input and group interaction.


Online

Understanding the Spectrum of Domestic Abuse

A 3 hour ZOOM workshop with Christiane Sanderson

About this event :

On average, two women a week in the UK are murdered by their partner or ex-partner. While much of the clinical literature focuses on physical violence in domestic abuse (DA), there is increasing evidence that power, control, coercion and emotional abuse is used to control partners in intimate relationships. This training day aims to enhance our understanding of DA, its impact and long term effects on survivors. It will look at the spectrum of DA, including the dynamics of control and coercion in emotional abuse through to physical and sexual violence and the role of shame and humiliation that silences those who are being domestically abused.

The training will consider the use of physical force, sexual violence, financial abuse, spiritual abuse and revenge porn, and identify those most at risk of DA including males and those in the LGBTQ community. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the processes involved in DA such as grooming victims, the cycle of abuse, the role of dissociation and thought blindness that supports the trauma bond which binds the couple. The aim is to understand how victims may present in practice, to identify signs and symptoms of DA and how they can be understood and supported. the role of attachment and fear of abandonment that underpins much of DA and how this manifests relationally both for the couple and practitioners working with DA.

The trainer:

Christiane Sanderson BSc, MSc. is a senior lecturer in Psychology at the University of Roehampton, of London with over 30 years of experience working with survivors of childhood sexual abuse and sexual violence. She has delivered consultancy, continuous professional development and professional training for parents, teachers, social workers, nurses, therapists, counsellors, solicitors, the NSPCC, Towards Healing, Ireland. the Catholic Safeguarding Advisory Committee, the Methodist Church, the Metropolitan Police Service, SOLACE, the Refugee Council, Birmingham City Council Youth Offending Team, and HMP Bronzefield.

Online

Self-care and collective care for therapists (and clients) during C-19

A 2 hour online ZOOM workshop with Meg-John Barker

About this event:

The Covid-19 pandemic has highlighted the way that real world social issues markedly impact all of our mental health and capacity to self-care. It has also demonstrated that more marginalised folks are disproportionately affected. Finally it has highlighted many ways in which organisations and communities can develop more collective - or mutual - forms of care and support in order to improve mental health, and to enable individual self-caring behaviours during such times of crisis.

Mainstream approaches to mental health tend to individualise such issues rather than recognising the social context in which they are inevitably located. We need to recognise the role of intersecting marginalisations in mental health struggles, and the ways in which social experiences such as poverty, discrimination, and the experience of trauma are highly related to psychological distress.

We also live in a wider culture which encourages the very kind of shame and self-critical thinking that’s a feature of all the most common mental health problems, and which make it very difficult to engage in self-compassion and self-care. We’re encouraged to feel fear that we might be lacking or failing in some way, and we’re sold products which claim to help us to allay those fears. Social media also encourages us to maintain the illusion of perfection online, leading to endless rounds of self-evaluation and comparison.

In a world where so many of us - and our clients - are struggling with very real social problems, it’s vitally important to acknowledge the cultural context we’re in and to resist individualising our suffering. This workshop explores trauma-informed models of interdependent self-care - or collective care - which we might consider.

Structure

● Introductions and hopes/aims for the session

● Adapting to pandemic and crisis

● Locating our distress culturally, systemically, and relationally

● Considering our needs in relation to self-care, making our plan

● Exploring systems and structures of support, developing our plan

● Take-aways

Outcomes

By the end of the session participants will have:

● Reflected on their own self-care practices in the light of social understandings and current crises

● Explored how their individual distress - and capacity to self-care - is embedded within wider cultures, systems, and dynamics or privilege/oppression

● Developed a self-care plan and a sense of systems and structures of support around this

The trainer:

Meg-John Barker is the author of a number of popular books on sex, gender, and relationships, including Queer: A Graphic History (with Julia Scheele), How To Understand Your Gender (with Alex Iantaffi), Enjoy Sex (How, When, and IF You Want To) (with Justin Hancock), Rewriting the Rules, The Psychology of Sex, and The Secrets of Enduring Love (with Jacqui Gabb).

They have also written numerous books, articles, chapters, and reports for scholars and counsellors, drawing on their own research and therapeutic practice. In particular they have focused their academic-activist work on the topics of bisexuality, open non-monogamy, sadomasochism, non-binary gender, and Buddhist mindfulness.

Barker is currently a senior lecturer in psychology at the Open University. They co-founded the journal Psychology & Sexuality and the activist-research organisation BiUK, through which they published The Bisexuality Report. They have advised many organisations, therapeutic bodies, and governmental departments on matters relating to gender, sexual, and relationship diversity (GSRD). They are also involved in facilitating many public events on sexuality and relationships, including Sense about Sex and Critical Sexology. They blog and podcast about all these topics on rewriting-the-rules.com and megjohnandjustin.com.

Twitter: @megjohnbarker.

Online

Breaking the Cycles of the Past Helping clients address the impact of Inter and Transgenerational Trauma

A 2 hour ZOOM counselling CPD workshop

The workshop:

The interplay between *transgenerational* (historical/societal) trauma and *intergenerational* (family trauma/traumatic attachments) affect many people and even entire generations. The collective trauma is transferred from the first generation to the second and further generations of off-springs. These trauma effects are passed on via complex post-traumatic stress disorder mechanisms, which can be psychological, physical, mental and spiritual. Common examples of historical trauma include, the Holocaust and African Slavery, but famine, natural disaster, war, terrorism, and displacement, can also produce similar effects of intergenerational trauma. Our identity and evolving sense of self are profoundly shaped by our histories.

The trainer

Dr Aileen Alleyne is a UKCP registered psychodynamic psychotherapist, clinical supervisor and organisational consultant. In addition to running her private practice in East Sussex and South East London, she is a visiting lecturer at several training institutions and a consultant on issues of race and cultural diversity within various workplace settings, such as, the NHS, Social Services, Education and the Police Services.